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Civil Rights

Cecilia is an Asian trans woman and activist. She previously served on the San Francisco Human Rights Commission and the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS. She currently directs Positively Trans, a project to improve health outcomes for transgender people with HIV and AIDS.

Cecilia is an Asian trans woman and activist. She previously served on the San Francisco Human Rights Commission and the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS. She currently directs Positively Trans, a project to improve health outcomes for transgender people with HIV and AIDS.

Cecilia Chung

Edith Garrud was a British suffragette famed for her knowledge of jiujitsu. In the run up to World War 1, she taught other suffragettes jiujitsu so they could better defend themselves against opponents and police.

Edith Garrud was a British suffragette famed for her knowledge of jiujitsu. In the run up to World War 1, she taught other suffragettes jiujitsu so they could better defend themselves against opponents and police.

Edith Garrud

Mary Thomas was one of the leaders of the Fireburn riot in 1878 in the Danish West Indies. She came to be called "Queen Mary" for her role in the rebellion in which free Black plantation workers demanded better conditions.

Mary Thomas was one of the leaders of the Fireburn riot in 1878 in the Danish West Indies. She came to be called "Queen Mary" for her role in the rebellion in which free Black plantation workers demanded better conditions.

Mary Thomas

Annie Dodge Wauneka was a Navajo woman who spent her life improving the health of the Navajo Nation. Reservations were filled with poverty and disease, so Waukneka spent her career merging Western medical practices with Navajo traditions. She became the first Native American to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1963.

Annie Dodge Wauneka was a Navajo woman who spent her life improving the health of the Navajo Nation. Reservations were filled with poverty and disease, so Waukneka spent her career merging Western medical practices with Navajo traditions. She became the first Native American to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1963.

Annie Dodge Wauneka

Anna Arnold Hedgeman was a civil and women's rights leader. She was the only woman on the committee that organized MLK's March on Washington and protested the lack of female speakers at the event. Hedgeman worked as the executive director of Truman's presidential campaign and co-founded the National Organization for Women.

Anna Arnold Hedgeman was a civil and women's rights leader. She was the only woman on the committee that organized MLK's March on Washington and protested the lack of female speakers at the event. Hedgeman worked as the executive director of Truman's presidential campaign and co-founded the National Organization for Women.

Anna Arnold Hedgeman

Callie House was an enslaved African American born just before the American Civil War. She went on to co-found and lead the National Ex-Slave Mutual Relief, Bounty and Pension association, which advocated for reparations for ex-slaves. Still a divisive issue today, House was one of the first to demand that the United States right its wrong against African Americans, rather than just cease it.

Callie House was an enslaved African American born just before the American Civil War. She went on to co-found and lead the National Ex-Slave Mutual Relief, Bounty and Pension association, which advocated for reparations for ex-slaves. Still a divisive issue today, House was one of the first to demand that the United States right its wrong against African Americans, rather than just cease it.

Callie House

Joan Trumpauer Mulholland was a prominent white activist for racial equality. Mulholland participated in lunch counter sit-ins, Freedom Rides, the March on Washington, and more. She was also the first white student at Tougaloo College and first white member of the Delta Sigma Theta sorority. Due to her activism, she was disowned by her family and even hunted by the KKK.

Joan Trumpauer Mulholland was a prominent white activist for racial equality. Mulholland participated in lunch counter sit-ins, Freedom Rides, the March on Washington, and more. She was also the first white student at Tougaloo College and first white member of the Delta Sigma Theta sorority. Due to her activism, she was disowned by her family and even hunted by the KKK.

Joan Trumpauer Mulholland

Charlotte Brown was forcibly removed from a San Francisco streetcar, a century before Rosa Park refused to give up her bus seat. Not only did she refuse to move, a suit against the railroad company awarded her $5,000 and affirmed the right of African Americans to ride San Francisco's streetcars.

Charlotte Brown was forcibly removed from a San Francisco streetcar, a century before Rosa Park refused to give up her bus seat. Not only did she refuse to move, a suit against the railroad company awarded her $5,000 and affirmed the right of African Americans to ride San Francisco's streetcars.

Charlotte L. Brown

Elizabeth Cady Stanton presented her "Declaration of Sentiments" at the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 and is often credited with launching the American women's suffrage movement. She also advocated for women's issues beyond voting, such as property, divorce, and birth control. Although she was originally an abolitionist, she refused to support citizenship and voting rights for African Americans.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton presented her "Declaration of Sentiments" at the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 and is often credited with launching the American women's suffrage movement. She also advocated for women's issues beyond voting, such as property, divorce, and birth control. Although she was originally an abolitionist, she refused to support citizenship and voting rights for African Americans.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Gilman was a prominent feminist writer in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. She most famously wrote "The Yellow Wallpaper," which discusses depression and women's lack of autonomy. She divorced her first husband, unusual in her time, and was a lifelong advocate of social reform.

Gilman was a prominent feminist writer in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. She most famously wrote "The Yellow Wallpaper," which discusses depression and women's lack of autonomy. She divorced her first husband, unusual in her time, and was a lifelong advocate of social reform.

Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Aqeela Asifi is an Afghan refugee living in Pakistan who has dedicated her life to helping refugee Afghan girls get an education. Although she started small, over time she’s taught more than 1000 girls and some of her students have started schools of their own.

Aqeela Asifi is an Afghan refugee living in Pakistan who has dedicated her life to helping refugee Afghan girls get an education. Although she started small, over time she’s taught more than 1000 girls and some of her students have started schools of their own.

Aqeela Asifi

Dorothy Height was a prominent civil rights leader who counseled the likes of Eleanor Roosevelt, Eisenhower, and Lyndon Johnson. Height was an organizer of the March on Washington and served as the president of the National Council of Negro Women for 40 years. Height is often credited with connecting the issues of African American rights and women's rights as issues that could and should be advanced together.

Dorothy Height was a prominent civil rights leader who counseled the likes of Eleanor Roosevelt, Eisenhower, and Lyndon Johnson. Height was an organizer of the March on Washington and served as the president of the National Council of Negro Women for 40 years. Height is often credited with connecting the issues of African American rights and women's rights as issues that could and should be advanced together.

Dorothy Height

Mary Tape was a Chinese immigrant to California who challenged school segregation for Chinese Americans in that state. Tape attempted to enroll her youngest child Mamie in a primary school, but was denied. She and her family filed a suit, which they won; however, "separate but equal" still remained the law in her school district for a while longer.

Mary Tape was a Chinese immigrant to California who challenged school segregation for Chinese Americans in that state. Tape attempted to enroll her youngest child Mamie in a primary school, but was denied. She and her family filed a suit, which they won; however, "separate but equal" still remained the law in her school district for a while longer.

Mary Tape

Fannie Lou Hamer was a prominent civil rights activist and co-founder of the Freedom Democratic Party. Hamer was fired and kicked out of her lodgings after attempting to register to vote in 1962. During her active years as an activist, she was beaten nearly to death by police and shot at by white supremacists. Hamer spoke at the 1964 Democratic National Convention, and is remembered as a resilient activist and beautiful singer.

Fannie Lou Hamer was a prominent civil rights activist and co-founder of the Freedom Democratic Party. Hamer was fired and kicked out of her lodgings after attempting to register to vote in 1962. During her active years as an activist, she was beaten nearly to death by police and shot at by white supremacists. Hamer spoke at the 1964 Democratic National Convention, and is remembered as a resilient activist and beautiful singer.

Fannie Lou Hamer

Colvin was arrested at age 15 in 1955 after refusing to give up her seat to a white woman on a segregated bus, about 9 months before a similar incident involving Rosa Parks. She was one of four plaintiffs in the case Browder v. Gayle, which led to the US Supreme Court declaring Alabama bus segregation unconstitutional.

Colvin was arrested at age 15 in 1955 after refusing to give up her seat to a white woman on a segregated bus, about 9 months before a similar incident involving Rosa Parks. She was one of four plaintiffs in the case Browder v. Gayle, which led to the US Supreme Court declaring Alabama bus segregation unconstitutional.

Claudette Colvin

In New York City in 1854, Elizabeth Jennings was forcibly removed from a segregated streetcar. She filed a suit against the company which led to the desegregation of NYC's transit systems. She went on to found the city's first kindergarten for African American children.

In New York City in 1854, Elizabeth Jennings was forcibly removed from a segregated streetcar. She filed a suit against the company which led to the desegregation of NYC's transit systems. She went on to found the city's first kindergarten for African American children.

Elizabeth Jennings Graham

Alice Stokes Paul was a militant American suffragette who was influential in American women's suffrage. To achieve equality, Paul marched on Washington, was arrested several times, and went on hunger strikes.

Alice Stokes Paul was a militant American suffragette who was influential in American women's suffrage. To achieve equality, Paul marched on Washington, was arrested several times, and went on hunger strikes.

Alice Stokes Paul

Pauli Murray was a Black lesbian lawyer who’s work formed the basis of an end to segregation and the extension of the Equal Protection Clause to women. In 1940, she was arrested when she sat toward the front of a segregated bus. She was one of very few women in her class at Howard and became the first African-American woman to become an Episcopal priest.

Pauli Murray was a Black lesbian lawyer who’s work formed the basis of an end to segregation and the extension of the Equal Protection Clause to women. In 1940, she was arrested when she sat toward the front of a segregated bus. She was one of very few women in her class at Howard and became the first African-American woman to become an Episcopal priest.

Pauli Murray

Evelyn Yoshimura is a lifelong Asian American community organizer and activist. Yoshimura pushed the Asian American studies program at her college, was one of the original employees of the Little Tokyo Service Center, and advocated for reparations for interned Japanese Americans during WW2. She continues to work in and advocate for Little Toyko.

Evelyn Yoshimura is a lifelong Asian American community organizer and activist. Yoshimura pushed the Asian American studies program at her college, was one of the original employees of the Little Tokyo Service Center, and advocated for reparations for interned Japanese Americans during WW2. She continues to work in and advocate for Little Toyko.

Evelyn Yoshimura

Viola Liuzzo was a white mother of 5 who drove from Detroit to Alabama in the wake of Bloody Sunday to support the civil rights movement there. On a trip from dropping activists at the airport, Liuzzo was murdered while driving with a Black man by the KKK. An FBI informant was in the car with the KKK members, and the FBI immediately launched a smear campaign against Liuzzo, which took 13 years to be completely uncovered.

Viola Liuzzo was a white mother of 5 who drove from Detroit to Alabama in the wake of Bloody Sunday to support the civil rights movement there. On a trip from dropping activists at the airport, Liuzzo was murdered while driving with a Black man by the KKK. An FBI informant was in the car with the KKK members, and the FBI immediately launched a smear campaign against Liuzzo, which took 13 years to be completely uncovered.

Viola Liuzzo

Faith Bandler was an Australian civil rights activist who was instrumental in the campaign to remove discrimination against Aboriginal Australians from the country's constitution. Bandler was of South Sea Islander heritage and her father's kidnapping and enslavement from his homeland motivated much of her activism. She was a beloved activist in her communities and country.

Faith Bandler was an Australian civil rights activist who was instrumental in the campaign to remove discrimination against Aboriginal Australians from the country's constitution. Bandler was of South Sea Islander heritage and her father's kidnapping and enslavement from his homeland motivated much of her activism. She was a beloved activist in her communities and country.

Faith Bandler

Coretta Scott King fought for civil rights beside her husband, and continued long after his assassination. Coretta was a passionate and talented singer. Over time, she expanded her focus from civil rights to include women's rights, children's rights, LGBT rights, environmental justice, and many more issues beyond.

Coretta Scott King fought for civil rights beside her husband, and continued long after his assassination. Coretta was a passionate and talented singer. Over time, she expanded her focus from civil rights to include women's rights, children's rights, LGBT rights, environmental justice, and many more issues beyond.

Coretta Scott King

Elizabeth Peratrovich was key figure in the civil rights movement for Alaskan Natives. A Tlingit woman, she advocated for the passage of the first anti-discrimination law in the US, Alaska's Anti-Discrimination Act of 1945, which banned the segregation of Alaska Natives.

Elizabeth Peratrovich was key figure in the civil rights movement for Alaskan Natives. A Tlingit woman, she advocated for the passage of the first anti-discrimination law in the US, Alaska's Anti-Discrimination Act of 1945, which banned the segregation of Alaska Natives.

Elizabeth Peratrovich

Amelia Boynton Robinson was a prominent civil rights activist in Selma, Alabama. She was a leader of the 1965 Selma to Montgomery march, during which she was beaten bloody and unconscious by police on Edmund Pettus Bridge. She never gave up, and in 2015 she crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge again, this time hand-in-hand with President Barack Obama.

Amelia Boynton Robinson was a prominent civil rights activist in Selma, Alabama. She was a leader of the 1965 Selma to Montgomery march, during which she was beaten bloody and unconscious by police on Edmund Pettus Bridge. She never gave up, and in 2015 she crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge again, this time hand-in-hand with President Barack Obama.

Amelia Boynton Robinson

Viola Desmond was a Canadian civil rights activist and businesswoman, best known for her refusal to leave a whites-only area of a movie theatre in Nova Scotia. The case she brought to challenge the segregation was unsuccessful; however, her story brought national attention to the issue of racial segregation in Canada, largely launching Canada’s civil rights movement. In 2018, she became the first Black person to appear on a Canadian bank note.

Viola Desmond was a Canadian civil rights activist and businesswoman, best known for her refusal to leave a whites-only area of a movie theatre in Nova Scotia. The case she brought to challenge the segregation was unsuccessful; however, her story brought national attention to the issue of racial segregation in Canada, largely launching Canada’s civil rights movement. In 2018, she became the first Black person to appear on a Canadian bank note.

Viola Desmond

Ida B. Wells was born into slavery during the Civil War and went on to become a prominent African American journalist and anti-lynching advocate. At 22, Wells was thrown off a train despite having a ticket and reportedly bit the hand of the man moving her. She traveled the world, bringing light to African American issues, particularly lynching, and was one of the founders of the NAACP.

Ida B. Wells was born into slavery during the Civil War and went on to become a prominent African American journalist and anti-lynching advocate. At 22, Wells was thrown off a train despite having a ticket and reportedly bit the hand of the man moving her. She traveled the world, bringing light to African American issues, particularly lynching, and was one of the founders of the NAACP.

Ida B. Wells

Yuri Kochiyama was a lifelong civil rights champion and a survivor of Japanese internment during WW2. Kochiyama was friends with Malcolm X and was in favor of Black separatism and opposed to war and imperialism. Along with her husband, she advocated for reparations for Japanese-American internees in the 1980s, which was signed into law in 1988.

Yuri Kochiyama was a lifelong civil rights champion and a survivor of Japanese internment during WW2. Kochiyama was friends with Malcolm X and was in favor of Black separatism and opposed to war and imperialism. Along with her husband, she advocated for reparations for Japanese-American internees in the 1980s, which was signed into law in 1988.

Yuri Kochiyama